Electrical Repair for Fleet Vehicles Bozeman MT

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Electrical Repair for Fleet Vehicles. You will find informative articles about Electrical Repair for Fleet Vehicles, including "Electrical system checkup", "Troubleshooting electrical alternators", and "Check-up for your electrical system". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Bozeman, MT that can help answer your questions about Electrical Repair for Fleet Vehicles.

M and W Repair Inc
(406) 587-5506
1010 N Rouse Avenue
Bozeman, MT
Services
Electrical Repair,Speedometer Repair

B and B Auto Repair
(406) 587-5306
107 Commercial Drive, # C
Bozeman, MT
Services
Brake Repair,Electrical Repair,Mufflers Repair

Toms Alignment Center
(406) 587-1011
116 N Black Avenue
Bozeman, MT
Services
Alignment Repair,Electrical Repair,Mufflers Repair

Meineke Car Care Center
(406) 522-1582
2114 Boot Hill Court
Bozeman, MT
Services
Brake Repair,Electrical Repair,Mufflers Repair

Power Train Plus
(406) 388-1887
5172 Jackrabbit Lane
Belgrade, MT
Services
AC and Heating Repair,Electrical Repair,Mufflers Repair,Transmission Repair

Auto Electric Station
(406) 587-5506
1010 N Rouse Avenue
Bozeman, MT
Services
Electrical Repair

Fosters Master Tech
(406) 586-8712
2105 Lea Avenue, # B
Bozeman, MT
Services
AC and Heating Repair,Brake Repair,Car Detailing,Electrical Repair,Interior Cleaning,Mufflers Repair

Precision Automotive Repair
(406) 522-3911
115 Commercial Drive, # B
Bozeman, MT
Services
Brake Repair,Electrical Repair,Mufflers Repair,Truck Parts

Best Rate Towing and Repair
(406) 388-1608
1380 Amsterdam Road
Belgrade, MT
Services
Electrical Repair,Mobile Auto Repair,Radiator Repair

Mills Repair
(406) 388-4213
119 W Main Street
Belgrade, MT
Services
Electrical Repair,Mufflers Repair

Check-up for your electrical system

Battery woes are common in winter, but what the people in the battery business know is that summer weakens a battery. Heat is what really damages your battery, with the increased demand of cold-weather cranking finishing the job. What can you do about it?

Here are six helpful battery tips from Kenworth:

1. Check for and remove corrosion on the terminals. Ensure that all cable connections are tight, including interconnecting battery cables, battery and mag switch cables to the starter, alternator cables, and beyond.

Inspect the drive belt on your alternator -- is it tight and in good condition?

Repeat these checks frequently in bad weather -- the chemicals used to de-ice roads can be highly corrosive.

2. Load-testing and more. These checks require equipment and experience. Mechanically-inclined owner/-operators or fleet service technicians may be able to do them; your Kenworth PremierCare Parts & Service dealer can certainly run them.

3. Check your batteries with a load tester.
Test the cranking, solenoid control and charging circuits for excessive voltage drop.

4. Drawing on the battery cab for comfort devices?
The advice here is to buy an inverter specifically designed for your truck – your best source to guarantee this is the dealership, not a truck stop, where they may be selling RV or marine inverters. Kenworth PremierCare dealers offer a line of Delco Remy inverters for sleeper/truck applications with low voltage protection to ensure that trucks will start when drivers are ready to go again.

5. Need a battery, check ratings. T he cold cranking amps (CCA) number is how much power a battery can deliver at 0 degrees F (-18 degrees C). The number can range from the 500s to over 900 and is measured in amperes.

The cranking amps (CA) number is the power delivered at 32 degrees F, or 0 degrees C. A battery's ability to supply power is halved by every 10 degree drop in the temperature.

Reserve capacity (RC) is...

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Electrical system checkup

According to Kenworth Truck Co. engineers, battery woes are common in winter, but what the people in the battery business know is that summer weakens a battery.

Heat is what really damages batteries, with the increased demand of cold-weather cranking finishing the job. Here are some quick tips to help keep batteries and electrical systems in good working condition:

1. Inspect batteries: Look for leaks and make sure there are no cracks in the case.

2. Check for and remove corrosion on terminals: Ensure that all cable connections are tight, including interconnecting battery cables, battery and mag switch cables to the starter, alternator cables, and beyond.

3. Inspect the drive belt on the alternator: Make sure belts are tight and in good condition.

4. Check batteries: Use a load tester to check batteries. Test the cranking, solenoid control and charging circuits for excessive voltage drop. Fleets should use TMC RP129 to determine the maximum allowable voltage drop when testing charge/start circuits.

In addition, if fleet vehicles are drawing on the battery to power sleeper-cab creature comforts, consider buying an inverter. Look for inverters that are specifically made for sleeper/truck applications with low voltage protection to ensure that your truck will start when you’re ready to go again.
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Troubleshooting electrical alternators

The experts at Haldex offer these tips (Be sure to place vehicle in neutral and disconnect batteries before working on the electrical system):

Test the batteries before installing the alternator: Batteries must be in good condition, have the proper capacity and be fully charged.

Inspect all wire and battery cables: These and connections must be tight and free of corrosion.

Inspect the fan and pulley: A damaged fan will affect the cooling of the alternator, decreasing its life. A damaged pulley may cause the drive belts to slip. A fan and pulley out of balance can cause premature failure.

Properly torque the fan and pulley in place: Install the fan and pulley and torque the pulley nut to 70−80 ft.-lbs. This will locate the rotor properly in the alternator.

Use proper mounting hardware: Use grade 5 bolts and self-locking nuts when mounting the alternator. Use hardened flat washers under the bolts and lock nuts. Do not use lock washers.

If alternator fails to charge after proper installation: It may be necessary to increase the engine speed until the regulator turns on. Units in inventory, dissembled or serviced may need to have their magnetism reestablished. To magnetize the rotor, connect the alternator to the electrical system. With the engine off momentarily, connect a jumper lead from the battery positive to the relay terminal of the alternator. This will restore the magnetism in the rotor and the alternator will begin operating correctly.

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